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We’ve recently had a few people (racing pigeon people by the looks of it) contact us on our YouTube account who are critical of us and our two tame, disabled pigeons, Elmo and Georgie.

We have been told to get homer pigeons instead since they are smarter and better looking than Elmo and Georgie (who are feral pigeons).

How superficial!! As if we care what pigeon is the best looking or the smartest. We love our pigeons because of their loving nature and amazing character.

We have also been told that our pigeons are not as happy as we think they are because they are ill.

Let me first state that neither Georgie or Elmo are ill. They both were affected by disease when they were babies – 11 years ago in Elmo’s case and 4 years ago in Georgie’s case – but are now perfectly healthy. However, according to one man (who has 34 years of experience keeping racing pigeons), our pigeons are not happy, we are spreading disease and we should euthanise them.

Our pigeons are very happy. I may not have decades of experience, but I do know my two pigeons. Georgie I have known since she was a baby; I’ve cared for her and learnt to read her behaviour and needs. Elmo is an open book. We can see the contentment and love in his eyes when he’s snuggled up to us – there is absolutely no doubt in our minds.

I find it hard to understand how anyone who views our videos of Elmo and Georgie can possibly think that they are unhappy. For someone who has 34 years of experience keeping pigeons he’s not very perceptive.

I will not engage in further conversation with these people since I have found them unwilling to listen, so I won’t get upset and drawn into a protracted argument, however, it does upset me to a degree to know that there’s someone out there who thinks I should put my pigeons to sleep because, according to them, they are unhappy and diseased.

:(


We’re so happy to report that Georgie is back to normal! :D

She’s eating as normal, poops are normal and there are no signs of any infection or illness. Georgie is still on the thin side but she’s putting on weight again (we’re weighing her every day). We are very relieved and happy. Thank you all for your well-wishes and love. Georgie appreciates it too!

Here’s some photos of our darling pigeons, Elmo and Georgie:

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Feather-wear!

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Doesn't Georgie look stylish?

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Where's your head, Elmo?

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There it is!! :)

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Elmo with my ratty, Templeton.

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Relaxed and sleepy!

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A wing out for comfort.

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Sleepy boy!

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And that famous "sitting on wing" pose that pigeons love to adopt.


At work at a wildlife rescue centre I see a lot of injured, ill and often very scruffy looking pigeons – ones that have come in after having escaped the clutches of a sparrowhawk and have injuries and many missing feathers, or ones that are very thin and weak. So I am somewhat surprised to see my sleek and shiny girl when I return home. I forget how healthy Georgie is, and although she’s not as heavy as other pigeons, she’s still got a nice layer of muscle and fat on her.

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"Don't point that camera at me!"

I have George on my lap at the moment – she’s kicking out her feet in attempts to mould my body into a nice comfy nest. Once she thinks she’s made her ‘nest’ suitable she’ll settle down for a snooze. We still have no eggs and I’m starting to think that Georgie has given up on the idea. … She’s only 3 years old and so still has many more years of egg laying if she wants to start up again.

When she’s all snuggled up like this I can have a closer look at her and admire the tiny feathers around her beak and eyes. She’s got a few white ones there, small delicate little feathers. Very pretty!

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Earlier on Georgie modelled her take on the ‘feather hat’:

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I think she pulls it off better that this lady: