We'd love to hear what you think of our site. Please let us know by filling in the form below!

 
Social Network Links
Pages

George had another trip to the vets because of the ulcer on her eye (read: August news – part 1). The white dot seemed to grow into a lump on her eye and I could see it bothered Georgie a lot. Poor girl!

P1120267

P1120279

Thankfully, the white thing fell off her eye and she’s no longer got any irritation there. We had her checked by the vet, thinking that we’d get the all clear, however, the ulcer is still there and we were given some different eye drops to see if that would help clear it all up. Georgie was also prescribed antibiotics.

On top of the eye problem, poor Georgie seems to have injured her right leg somehow and it’s at an odd angle. She’s still weight bearing on it but she does have a more pronounced limp now. The vet said they could x-ray the leg to see what’s going on, but that’s something I’m not too keen on because of the risk of anaesthetic in birds. The vet we go to is an avian and exotic veterinary surgery and are very good at what they do, however, I’m still a bit hesitant about having Georgie x-rayed. So Georgie has some pain relief and anti-inflammatory medication to help with any nerve damage in the leg (from her egg laying. Georgie does get temporary paralysis sometimes when she lays eggs). My husband and I will have to weigh up the pros and cons of having Georgie x-rayed and come to a decision soon.

Georgie is her usual self, eating and drinking as normal, not depressed or acting in pain, so at least I know she’s not too upset about all her health issues. I know birds hide their pain and illness very well, and Georgie is cooing and sitting on my lap behaving as if she hasn’t got anything wrong with her. I don’t know if it’s all the medication she’s on or if she’s just a very good actress. I am certainly keeping a close eye on her to ensure she’s not getting any worst.

I took some photos of her right leg but I don’t think they came out very well. You may not see the problem. I know you will all wish Georgie a speedy recovery and good health, and I will certainly keep you updated on what’s happening.


Poor Georgie had to endure a trip to the vet because of an eye problem. We noticed that she was keeping her right eye closed and that it looked quite red and irritated. I at first thought she had a feather or something else stuck in it, but after a gentle look I couldn’t see anything. Then I noticed that there was a opaque white dot on her eye, which wasn’t there before. Now, Georgie’s eyes are normally cloudy due to the scarring, but the white mark was a new development.

P1120220

Georgie's right eye - with white dot in it.

The vet put some yellow drops in Georgie’s eye to determine if it was what she suspected, an ulcer – and it was. So some eye drops were prescribed for me to put in Georgie’s eye (which Georgie isn’t too happy about). I also asked the vet if there was anything I could give her for car sickness, and she’s given me some medication as a trial to see if it helps. I sure hope it does since Georgie will soon have a long car journey ahead of her (more on this later).

P1120224

Georgie's left eye

In other news, Elmo is still trying to go under the sofa. It’s his new favourite spot!

P1120214

P1120217

P1120203

He keeps “crawling” under and falling asleep. Maybe he feels safe under there? Or perhaps there’s some treats that have rolled under which he’s trying to get to? :) The other day he was almost completely under the sofa! I sadly didn’t get the opportunity to take a photo of it before he made his way out again. Elmo sure is a silly boy! He’s always doing something new to surprise me.


I took Georgie to the vet today because she has been limping for some days after laying another pair of eggs (we use the lovely vets at Trinity Vet Centre). This has happened before – and the limp usually goes away after a day or so – so I initially wasn’t too worried, however, this time the limp has persisted so a vet trip was in order.

It seems that Georgie has been sitting on eggs for such a long time now, and I really miss her company. When incubating, she stays in her nest and doesn’t like to be bothered – and since Georgie has laid 3 pairs of eggs in the past two months, I haven’t seen much of her.

P1080948

Georgie in her nest

I have been giving Georgie extra calcium supplements to help her with the strain of egg production, but I think that it took its toll – hence the limping. The last egg must have hit a nerve, causing the weakness in her leg.

The vet checked Georgie over and was happy with her body condition. He wasn’t worried that there was permanent damage to Georgie’s leg and he prescribed pain relief and anti-inflammatory medication to help reduce any swelling and deal with any pain she may have in her leg. I’m sure it’ll work quickly and Georgie will be able to use her right leg again soon.

I now need to convince Georgie to stop laying eggs. The vet suggested a few tactics which I knew about but really need to research more and choose the right method for her: e.g. reduce daylight hours, disrupting her environment so she doesn’t feel stable enough to lay eggs, or hormone injections.

Here’s some more information about it: Discouraging breeding behavior in pet birds and Reducing egg production in racing pigeons.

Georgie in better health:

P1080893

P1080889


On the 29th Dec 2010 (in Egg free at last) I wrote: “George has in fact filled out very nicely in the past month. She feels really chunky and solid, which I’m very happy about since she has always been a bit too slight and thin. I hope she doesn’t loose her “pregnancy” weight!”

Boy do I regret saying that. Georgie stopped eating on that day and for days refused to eat her seed. So I tried popping some peanuts down her throat, however, she simply vomited them up later. :(

Not wanting to cause her to become even more ill, I decided not to force-feed her anymore. Sometimes, giving food can cause more problems. A vet visit was scheduled, and Georgie lost all that lovely weight she had gained.

Basically, Georgie stopped eating for about 4 days. On the fifth she wolfed down some granary bread and had a go at her seed – but not in her cage! She refused to eat from the seed bowl if it was in her cage – so we put it on the sofa and she had a field day – swishing seed left and right and making an awful mess.

An important message regarding ill birds: Since birds are very good at hiding any illness you often won’t notice anything until it has progressed quite far. So if you suspect anything is wrong with your bird, contact your avian vet immediately, otherwise it may be too late.

Sometimes I forget this. Georgie was acting normal and looking fine except for the simple fact that she wasn’t eating. And when she did start eating, she wouldn’t eat when in her cage. It got very frustrating.

However, after the visit to the avian vet we felt better about Georgie. In fact, on that day Georgie had eaten a lot of seed from her bowl in her cage, but vomited it all up on the journey to the vet due to car sickness. It was nice to see that Georgie had eaten, but upsetting that it had to come all out.

The vet said that Geogie most likely had an eye infection when she was a baby due to mycoplasma bacteria which scarred her eyes (the cloudiness) and distorted her pupils (it’s so nice to finally have an explanation for Georgie’s eye condition). This bacteria is laying dormant in her body until her immune system is compromised, such as when she’s using a lot of energy to produce and lay eggs. So the mycoplasma took the opportunity to attack Georgie’s system which made her lose her appetite. She’s on antibiotics and we also bought some vitamin and mineral supplements to give her on top of the calcium and vitamin D that she already receives (to boost her health).

At the moment Georgie is eating well but she’s still thinner than she should be and feels very light. We’re keeping a close eye if anything changes. I cannot bare to think of what would happen if the worst happened. Georgie has become such an integral part of my family and heart.

It’s always scary when your animal becomes ill. It can be hard to know what to do and when to act, however, a good vet that you can trust is really the best, as well as support and advice from good people in the pigeon rescue field!

Today Georgie was annoying Elmo and Richard so much because she kept walking over to Elmo’s side on the sofa to get some peanuts, however, she wasn’t swallowing any – just pecking at them and throwing them about. It seems they were all the wrong size for her liking! In the end, Richard popped a few into her mouth and she seemed grateful to be given a helping hand. She’d never have come to a decision on her own. (I guess this means I have to go search for smaller sized peanuts.)

Here’s the mess Georgie made on the sofa on the day she decided to eat again:

P1050433

P1050434